How to Fix Decorating Mistakes You’re Making

This article is part two of the previous article. Haven’t read it? Lets read on Decorating Mistakes You’re Making and How to Fix Them.

6. A frequent misconception is that painting some area white will make it feel larger and more delightful. Sometimes that works, says Los Angeles designer Emily Henderson, however when the space has very little all-natural light, white walls may appear flat and dull.

The Fix: Attempt a moderate to neutral color to add depth. Two of my favorites would be Portland Gray from Benjamin Moore and Aloof Gray from Sherwin Williams, ” she states. They’ve soft bluish undertones which change the wall colour slightly during the day, bringing longer life into a distance than plain white paint will.

How to Fix Decorating Mistakes You’re Making

7. Deciding on the Brightest Bulbs Each Moment. High quality bulbs have a tendency to’blow out’ a distance, so it ends up feeling cold and dull rather than warm and comfy.

Defaulting to White Walls in Every Room Photo By LINA STLING FOLIO GETTY IMAGES

Defaulting to White Walls in Every Room Photo By LINA STLING FOLIO GETTY IMAGES

The Fix: Move with 60 to 75 watt equivalent bulbs in most common areas to give off job level lighting which is not too extreme. In private spaces (bedrooms, baths ), a 40 to 60 watt equivalent bulb is the best bet it provides a milder, more atmospheric lighting that is still bright enough for reading, ” says Morris. Another frequent misstep: adhering with one overhead light. For performance, which may offer the ideal quantity of lighting, but it falls short. A overhead could be glaring and sense overbearing at a room, states Mat Sanders of Consort Design in nyc.

To balance it and make the area more inviting, you require a mixture of dining table, floor, or wall lighting. Some great guidelines: At a living room using a normal size couch (roughly six to eight feet ), use at least 2 table lamps, indicates Los Angeles designer Melissa Warner Rothblum. When there’s more than just one seating area inside the room, anchor with a floor lamp with a seat or a set of seats.

Choosing the Brightest Bulbs Every Time Photo By IMAGE SOURCE GETTY IMAGES

Choosing the Brightest Bulbs Every Time Photo By IMAGE SOURCE GETTY IMAGES

8. Decorating a Big Wall With a Single Piece of Teensy Art. When you choose artwork that’s too small, it looks like it’s awkwardly floating on the wall instead of anchoring the space, which is distracting.

The Fix: There’s an easy rule of thumb for hanging art above a sofa or bed. It should fill at least two thirds of the wall space above that piece of furniture to look and feel balanced. If you go smaller than that, even if you can’t articulate why, your eye understands something is amiss, says Griffin. But that doesn’t always mean you need giant framed prints. You can ‘cheat’ by hanging multiples either salon style or in a grid to get that wall coverage, says Griffin. If the pieces are uniform in size, leave an equal amount of space between them; if they vary in size, you can mix it up.

Decorating a Big Wall With a Single Piece of Teensy Art Photo By JAMES FRENCH GETTY IMAGES

Decorating a Big Wall With a Single Piece of Teensy Art Photo By JAMES FRENCH GETTY IMAGES

9. Overdoing the Sofa Pillows. It’s easy to feel like you need a whole bunch of throw pillows to make your couch feel cushy. But a big mix usually just ends up looking messy, says Los Angeles based designer Vanessa De Vargas.

The Fix: Stick with a more streamlined setup. Two pillows on each end are really all you need for a sofa that looks chic but not stuffy, says De Vargas. I prefer one big pillow and one small one on both ends, but you could also use pillows that are all the same size.

Overdoing the Sofa Pillows Photo By GS HERO IMAGES GETTY IMAGES

Overdoing the Sofa Pillows Photo By GS HERO IMAGES GETTY IMAGES

10. Blocking the Flow of a Room With Your Seating Setup. It’s tempting to arrange a sofa facing a window or fireplace, but if that means you’re seeing the back of the couch when you walk into the room, it’s generally a bad move. Being greeted by the back of your sofa and the backs of anyone sitting on it feels unwelcoming, says Andrew Howard, a designer in Jacksonville, Florida.

The Fix: Whenever you’ve got a large wall, use it to ground your sofa, says Howard. It’s less jarring to look at the backs of accent chairs because they aren’t as bulky. No way around exposing the so

Blocking the Flow of a Room With Your Seating Setup Photo By PAUL WHICHELOE

Blocking the Flow of a Room With Your Seating Setup Photo By PAUL WHICHELOE

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